Volks Charagumin Assembly Guides

(1) Checking the Parts

First and foremost, you must check the parts included in the package in order to prevent realizing that some parts were missing in the middle of the assembly process. We suggest you perform the check on a large surface like a clean table so as to avoid losing parts. Please be careful as there are numerous small parts included in the package.

Checking the Parts ■ Overview of the parts (total 66 pieces) 

If you find missing or damaged parts, please notify the aftercare service personnel within 2 weeks from the date of purchase. (For more information, please refer to the instruction manual)

Checking the Parts
Checking the Parts

■ Keep the Parts Separated According to The Size 

Put the large parts in a large tray, and detailed parts in smaller trays. This method is effective for avoiding the loss of parts during the assembly process.

 

 

(2) Preparing Your Tools

Once you have finished checking parts, next you must prepare your tools. Here we shall introduce the tools that are necessary for assembly.

[ Side Cutters ]
Preparing Tools
■ For this tutorial, we are using the Tamiya brand Side Cutter for Plastic.

The side cutter is used to nip off the excess plastic pieces that are connected to the parts. As this is an important tool for this process, we suggest using a quality side cutter. (The blades on cheap side cutters get dull rather quickly, and in turn may end up damaging the parts) There is no need to buy something that is overly expensive, but we suggest purchasing a quality hobby-craft side cutter that costs around 20 USD.

[ Design Knife / X-Acto Knife ]
Preparing Tools
■ For this tutorial, we are using the Tamiya brand Craft Tools Design Knife.

Upon making the general incisions with the side cutter, you use this tool to apply the finishing touches. X-Acto knife is relatively easier to use compared to snap-off blade utility knife, and it is easy to replace the blades. Please be careful as they are very sharp and require caution when using.

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[ Sand Paper ]
Preparing Tools
■ For this tutorial, we are using the Tamiya brand Finishing Abrasives P400.

This tool is used to clean up your incision marks and the lines that are a necessary result of the production process. We suggest using scissors to cut the sand paper to a size that is right for the task. Begin by using a sand paper with a small number (coarse) to prepare the foundation, and apply the finishing touches using one with a large number (fine). This will ensure a beautiful finish. There shan’t be any problems with using one with a number as large as 1000.

[ The Zoukei-mura Sanding Sponge ]
Preparing Tools
■For this tutorial, we are using the Zoukei-mura Sponge Paper #800~#1000.

This tool is used to touch up the surface that was treated with sand paper. Unlike sand paper, you can adjust the “grind” by adjusting the force you apply to the sponge. It is very useful for polishing curved surfaces on the part.

[ Double-Sided Tape ]
Preparing Tools
This is used to keep the parts in place during the mock-assembly process. Using tape that can be found at the local stationary store is more than sufficient. We suggest using one that is very adhesive. Mock-assembly is very important as you cannot re-adjust misplaced parts if you use glue from the start.

[ Fast Curing Glue ]
Preparing Tools
■ For this tutorial, we are using the Volks “Zoukei-mura Instant Glue for Garage Kits”.

After having completed the mock-assembly process, if you are satisfied with the finish, you can use a fast curing glue to fixate the parts. The glue with a thin nozzle is useful for working with small, detailed parts. Please make sure to check with the instruction manual so that you do not confuse the parts.

At this point, you have completed “checking the parts” and “preparing your tools”.

 

 

(3) Preparing the Parts

Washing the Parts »  |   What does it mean to Refine a Part?  »  |   Removing Excess Gate Residel »  |   Polishing the Parting-lines » 

♦ Washing the Parts - Prior to Refining -

Part refining is a technique that can be applied to plastic models as well as garage kits. It isn’t a difficult task, so please take your time to get it right.

Due to necessary circumstances in the production process, there will always be some oil-based mold release agent remaining on the surface as residue.

* What is mold release agent?

As its name implies, mold release agent is a lubricant used for the purpose of removing the parts from their molds smoothly. There is a possibility that paints and glues will not adhere to the surface of the parts if this residue is not removed.

As for Volks Inc. brand garage kits, we use a special mold release agent that minimizes the possibility of these problems occurring. However, the amount of residue varies from place to place; certain “hard to reach” areas may have enough residue to pose a problem. We advise you to clean off the areas where you plan to apply paints or glues.

The easiest solution is as follows:
It is using Zoukei-mura brand Zoukei-mura Cast Clean Spray (mold release agent remover).

Cleaning Up the Parts
■ The Cast Clean Spray is available at Volks stores and at the VOLKS Website Store.
* this product cannot be shipped overseas due to international shipping regulation. 

Place the parts in a deep container, and gently shake as you spray the cleaner. Please be sure to take precautionary measures for ventilation. We suggest performing this task outdoors.

Cleaning Up the Parts

Caution: Cast Clean Spray contains an organic solvent;
please do not use it on plastics and soft vinyl.

 

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This is a poly (polypropylene) beaker, useful when removing mold release agent. We recommend having at least one poly beaker available for use with garage kits.

Cleaning Up the Parts
■ After spraying, spread the parts out and let them dry.
Cleaning Up the Parts
■ Spread the parts on something like newspaper, and let them dry.

With this, we have completed the “pre-prep” preparations. Next up is the part refinement phase.

♦ What is part refinement?

Part refinement means preparing parts before assembly. Part refinement can be separated into two stages. First, you must remove the excess gate residue remaining on the surface of the parts. Second, remove and polish the parting lines.

As with plastic models, the molds used for the production of CharaGumin requires a spout for the urethane resin to be poured in from. This spout is called the “gate”. Similarly, the seams that appear along the edges of the molds are called the “parting-lines”.

Cleaning Up the Parts
■ This is an example of gate residue.
Cleaning Up the Parts
■ This is an example of a parting-line. You can see it on her neck.

Not only can these get in the way during assembly, neither are they pleasant to the eyes. So prior to beginning assembly, we suggest removing these using the various tools mentioned in “Preparing Your Tools” section. These preparations before assembly are called part refinement.

 

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♦ Removing Excess Gate Residue

In this phase, we use the side-cutter, X-Acto knife, sand paper, and sanding sponge. When removing the excess gate residue, although it is tempting to make the incision right at the base, we advise you to take this process with care. Let’s make the initial incision at approximately 1mm from the base of the excess gate residue.

Cleaning Up the Parts
■ Make the incision 1mm from the base.

Although it depends on the sharpness of the blades on the side-cutters, there is a chance you can damage the part itself if you attempt to cut the entire excess residue off in one go. Especially when the part itself is a thin or sharp one, or the gate residue is rather big, the “shock” from the side-cutter incision can cause the part to snap. There is also the possibility that the blades will dig into the part itself.

Although it depends on the sharpness of the blades on the side-cutters, there is a chance you can damage the part itself if you attempt to cut the entire excess residue off in one go. Especially when the part itself is a thin or sharp one, or the gate residue is rather big, the “shock” from the side-cutter incision can cause the part to snap. There is also the possibility that the blades will dig into the part itself.

The best approach is to leave a little bit of residue, and continue to whittle it down bit by bit. We recommend Tamiya's Precision Nipper. It is labeled as “for plastic models”, but it work just as wonderfully with urethane resin kits such as CharaGumin. Of course it depends on the shape and thickness of the gate mark, but the durability of urethane resin is about the same as that of plastic and is quite delicate. We suggest the use of sharp precision side-cutters for this task.

It's fine even if the side-cutters don’t get everything. You will remove this bit by bit afterwards using the X-Acto knife.

Cleaning Up the Parts
■ This is more than good enough.

Later you will clean this up along with the parting-lines. You do not need to have it perfect at this point in the process. Please take your time to get it close to the ideal shape.Note: Using sandpaper on clear parts will cause the surface to turn white.

 

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♦ Polishing the parting-lines

Next let's work on removing the parting-lines.

Cleaning Up the Parts
■ This is a parting-line.

Let us begin cleaning these up. In the image, we are using Tamiya's 400 grade finishing paper. Place the sand paper against the part, and polish using a circular motion. Begin with the areas closer to your body and proceed outwards.

Cleaning Up the Parts
■ Carefully polish along the curves.

The trick is to polish at an angle perpendicular to parting-line. Work with the curves of the parts, and make sure not to create any flat surfaces. Furthermore, sand down the remnants of the gate marks that you cleaned up previously in the same way.

Cleaning Up the Parts
■ Treat the gate residue no differently from the parting-lines.

This is the finished part. Everything has been cleanly removed. If you further polish the parts using a sanding sponge, you can achieve an even better finish.

Cleaning Up the Parts
■ Mission Complete!

Please repeat this process for each one of the parts. It seems to be an annoying work, but envisioning how the figure will turn out makes it easier. This is one of the enjoyments of assembling CharaGumin.

CharaGumin is designed such that most of the gate residues and parting-lines appear in places that minimize the visual effects on the figure. However due to the shape of the parts, there are some areas where they are located on the surface. For those who are bothered by them, the clean-up process will be essential. But for the parts that won't be visible once the figure is assembled, and for the parts that don't bother you, of course it's fine to leave them as they are. The most important thing is to have fun while building!

 

 

 

(4) Assembling the Head

What is Mock Assembly? »  |   Before using glue » 

First up is the head assembly (face). The face is the most important part of the figure, so it's best to assemble it unhurriedly and carefully.

♦ What is Mock Assembly? - Before using glue -

Mock Assembly, as its name suggests, is a trial run without using glue.
Chara Gumin has many assembly stages, as well as many parts, so we strongly suggest doing a trial assembly before gluing the parts. There are some parts which do not come together right if not glued in the right order, and parts with any warp or distortions must be fixed before putting them together, so it's best to check carefully during this procedure.

Assembling the Head
■ These are the head parts (total 10 parts + 1 part + eye stickers)

These are all the parts that make up the head.
Lina comes with two face parts: one which allows you to recreate her eyes using the eye stickers, and one where you can recreate her eyes by painting them. It's up to you which to choose, but for this tutorial, we are using the face part with eye stickers. First of all, attach the eyebrows to the face part, and then attach the eye stickers to the eye parts.

Assembling the Head
■ Hold the tab on the back and place the piece into the face part. Assembling the Head
■ Attach the front and back of the bandanna, and the “bangs”. Assembling the Head
■ How does she look? It’s just a mock assembly, but she already looks complete! 

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♦ Gluing ~Assembling the parts~

 

If you find no problems with the trial assembly, you can then proceed to fixate the parts. For this, you can use the instant glue introduced in earlier in this tutorial, but if you find yourself thinking "I might want to take the face off again later", or "I'm worried that if I glue the face I won't be able to undo it", then we recommend the following.

[ Double-Sided Tape ]
If you want a non-permanent attachment, using double-sided tape will allow you to attach parts safely without damaging them. However, the adhesive is not as strong, so it may come off over time. Furthermore, it is not suited for application on the main parts of the figure.

[ Hobby Glue ]

Assembling the Head
■ For the sake of this tutorial, we are using Tamiya’s “Craft Bond”.

This glue is designed for hobby and craft work. It takes some time to dry, and its adhesive strength is less than that of instant glue. Yet it is easier to remove the parts later, and without applying much strength at that. If you are afraid of making mistakes, we suggest using this glue. There are many other types of glue that are available such as rubber-based glues. It's best to choose different types depending on your preference and area of application.

In this tutorial, we use this craft glue to attach the eyes, the hair, and bandanna.

Assembling the Head
■ Apply the glue along the sides, and leave it overnight to dry.
Assembling the Head
■ The end product should turn out looking like this.

After attaching the bandanna and eyes, attach the front and rear hair parts, and the hair piece that goes on top... With this, you've done assembling the head.

Assembling the Head
■ The body is a trial assembly, but the overall vibe really comes out.

It's fine to attach the earrings at this point, but they may bump against other parts. So it may be better to do a trial assembly, or attach them with hobby glue for now.

 

 

 

5) Assembling the Arms

First let's take a look at the parts.

Assembling the Arms
■ Overview of the arm parts 

Out of all the arm parts, the ones that you really need to pay attention to are the clear parts. The lower parts of these pieces are transparent, so you need to remove the gate residue bits as cleanly as possible. If you use sandpaper on clear parts, the surface will become clouded, so it's best to stop the procedure after you do your best with the X-Acto knife.

Assembling the Arms
■ First, make the approximate incisions with the side-cutters. 
Assembling the Arms
■ ...then use the X-Acto knife to clean up bit by bit. 

* Be Careful of UV Rays ~Storing the Parts~

The material used for CharaGumin is a type of resin called 'urethane'. Urethane resin, like PVC, ABS, and other plastics used in finished figures, is a material that is refined from petroleum. Unlike other materials, it is more resistant against aging and solvents. However, like PVC, ABS, and other plastics it is susceptible to heat and UV rays. As a result, if you place it under direct sunlight or in a heated area, this may cause aging or other types of damage. The clear parts are particularly weak against UV rays and are more likely to change color. 
We recommend storing it somewhere away from a significant source of heat and direct sunlight.

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Assembling the Arms
■ The shapes of the reverse sides of the talisman’s platform differ in shape depending on where to put on. Be careful not to mix them up when working with them.
Assembling the Arms
■ Proceed with a trial assembly using tape, make sure not to mix up left and right arms.

Glue the parts after confirming their locations with the mock-assembly.
If you think you'd like to make further adjustments later, attach them using light hobby glue or leave them for later.

 

 

(6) Assembling the Torso

The upper body consists of 11 parts in total. Do a trial assembly here as well, and continue your work carefully and adjust any parts that do not fit well.

Assembling the Upper Body
■ Overview of the parts (total 11 parts)
Assembling the Upper Body
■ Example: this area of the white chest piece protrudes a little. So we proceed to shave it down.
Assembling the Upper Body
■ Example: if you don't properly clean up the gate residue on the yellow chest cloth piece, it will influence the overall assembly of the parts. 
Assembling the Upper Body
■ Here the parts have come together neatly.
Assembling the Upper Body
■ One more step to go.

The center of the torso piece serves as the core of the body, so please be sure to glue it firmly. The arms will be fixated after the lower body is finished, so put them aside for now. If you want to check the results of your efforts thus far, we recommend a trial assembly using double-sided tape.

 

(7) Assembling the Lower Body

Assembling the Belt »  |   Assembling the Legs and Skirt »  |   How to Fix Warped Parts »  |   Assembling the Boots »  |  Total Assembly » 

First, check the parts.

Assembling the Lower Body
■ Overview of parts to assemble (9 lower body parts + 7 belt parts) 

♦ Assembling the Belt

First of all, let’s start the assembly with the belt. There are many small parts, so please take the utmost care not to lose them. This applies to any work you're doing, it's best to spread the parts out on a clean wide surface. Allow yourself as much space as possible. When putting away the parts, it's safest to use a tray.

Assembling the Lower Body
■ Completed Belt 

♦ Assembling the Legs and Skirt

The thing you may notice here is the seam lines along the center of the legs. They're fine as they are, but if you want to remove them, please be careful with the curvature of the leg parts. Make sure to follow the curve while sanding them. When sanding the same area for longer periods of time, please be careful not to cause that area to become flat. Remove the seams cleanly while sanding thoroughly all over. We particularly recommend the sanding sponge here as it is easy to use for following the curved surfaces.

Assembling the Lower Body
■ (When we asked Mr. Araizumi...) We were provided with the answer that apparently what she is wearing are leggings. 
Assembling the Lower Body
■ The picture shows sponge paper 'superfine' #400-#600 grade. (The 'ultrafine' sponge paper we introduced in section 2) This grade of sanding sponge is used to achieve a delicate finish, but here we use a slightly coarser grade. 
Assembling the Lower Body
■ Work carefully with the curve... 
Assembling the Lower Body
■ ...Finish up with 'ultrafine' grade. 

Next comes the skirt. The gate residues on the exterior of these parts are the largest.

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Assembling the Lower Body

Like with the other gate marks, refine the shape bit by bit. Once done, you can proceed to the trial assembly and gluing phases. If you find any gaps between parts during trial assembly, refine the parts a little more prior to doing any gluing. For example, note the gap between the white line and the red cloth in the picture below.

Assembling the Lower Body
■ For a gap like this, it is possible to force it shut using glue, but if you apply too much force, it's possible that the parts may be broken. 

Thin or slender parts made of urethane resin are more prone to warping, even if the original prototype fits together perfectly. The heat applied during the manufacture can sometimes cause minor gaps to occur.

* How to Fix Warped Parts

Urethane resin is a material that gets softer when heated. So for the areas that you wish to remove warping from, use a hairdryer to apply heat or put them in hot water of about 80-90 degrees (Celsius) for 20 seconds, and they will become soft enough that you can fix the warped area with your own hands.


Assembling the Lower Body
■ Dip them into hot water (please be careful you don't burn yourself when retrieving them!) 
Assembling the Lower Body
■ After retrieving them from the water, fix the warp while they are still warm (Be careful not to burn yourself) 

Once you are satisfied with the shape, run cold water over the piece in order to cool it. The part will regain is rigidity.

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♦ Assembling the Boots

After the lower body is done, the most important parts are the boots. Assembly itself is fairly simple, but it is a very important area for making sure that she stands up straight.
In particular, please take extra care when cleaning up the gate residue on the soles of both boots. If you remove too much resin, it will make her balance worse, so don't overdo it. Instead, if you make them basically level, you can come back and adjust them later after you've assembled the rest of the figure.

Assembling the Lower Body
■ Finish up by attaching the accessories.

Begin the total assembly once all the parts are prepared.

Assembling the Lower Body
■ We suggest first doing a test assembly using double-sided tape cut into small pieces.

If there are any parts that don't fit well, use sandpaper and the X-Acto knife to tidy them up as you progress. Again, please be careful not to mix up the left and right parts.

Assembling the Lower Body
■ The lower body is complete

At this point, the body is basically complete.

♦ Overall Assembly (Without Cape)

The head, arms, torso, lower body, and belt are now complete. Having come this far, we can now assemble the whole body.


■ Behold her gallant appearance!

There are still things that have yet to be done before she's complete. You can relish in the feeling of achievement moment by moment, every step of the way. At last, we've reached the point where she is fully standing. Just a little more until she's finished!

 

(8) Assembling the Cape part 1 (Bonus Challenge: Painting the Cape)

Try Painting the Cape! »  |   About Paints »  |   About the Tools »  |   The Painting Process » 

[ Extra Chapter: Try Painting ]

~ Why not take a little more time, and increase the completeness of your figure? ~
When you think of Lina = Inverse, the self-styled “beautiful genius sorceress and swordsman”, one of her trademarks that really catches the eye is her cape. Before you start assembling it, why not take a little more time here on the cape, and increase the overall completeness of your figure?

First of all, check the parts.

Assembling the Cape: Part 1 (Extra: try painting!)
■ Overview of the cape parts (13 parts total) 

Larger parts have large gate residue and seams. Clean them up carefully; always taking the time to stop and check if you haven't taken off too much, and that you haven't sanded the curved areas flat.

♦ Try Painting the Cape!

The lining on the cape is purple in the anime, while it comes black with the kit. So why not try applying paint to the lining? Aim to make her look even closer to the original. There may be some of you thinking things like “but I've never painted before...” or “can I really do it well...?” Don't worry ? it's very easy!

♦ About Paints

The general term “paint” encompasses a wide variety of paints. Even within the realm of hobby paints, there are types such as 'lacquers', 'water-based acrylics', 'enamels' and so on. As for painting methods, there are also various types such as 'airbrushing', 'brush painting', and painting with spray paint from a can. For the sake of painting Chara Gumin, we recommend the easy-to-use water-based acrylic Vallejo Color paint in the instruction manual. Let's try using these Vallejo Color paints with a brush and see how they turn out!
These are the colors we are using for the cape.↓


* Game Color #087 (Violet) … 90% / Model Color #001 (White) … 10%
Assembling the Cape: Part 1 (Extra: try painting!)

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♦ About the Tools

First, we have the paint tray. This is of course, for pouring our paints on and mixing. Any kind of small plate is fine; for our tutorial, we are using this one.
This is a Mannennsha brand paint tray. There is a fair amount of surface area on the cape, so we suggest using a brush with a wide tip. With this tutorial, we shall be using a GSI Creos' 'Mr Brush Broad Brush #6'.

Assembling the Cape: Part 1 (Extra: try painting!)

♦ Painting

Sometimes Vallejo Colors pigments may settle at the bottom of the bottle, so give the bottle a good shake before each use. (There's no problem with shaking it well and mixing the contents.) Proceed to create a color that suits your image. These two colors have basically the same ingredients so it's fine to mix them together.

The place you'll be painting is the entire lining of the cape, a fairly large area, so put a fair amount of paint in the paint dish. If you run out partway through, you'll have to recreate the color again, and it's quite difficult to recreate exactly the same color, so once the color is decided, please make sure you have plenty before you start using it.

Usually one mixes a darker color into a lighter one to adjust the color tone, but the color we're aiming for this time uses 90% violet as a base and Vallejo's white is quite strong, so we suggest mixing the white into the violet to adjust the color. Please make sure you don't mix it too much and cause it to froth up.

Assembling the Cape: Part 1 (Extra: try painting!)
■ Add white little by little to violet 

Once you've created the color you want, begin painting. Vallejo Colors soak into the brush well, so each stroke is capable of painting large areas. Furthermore, Vallejo Colors are sold “ready to use”, and can be used immediately out of the bottle.

Assembling the Cape: Part 1 (Extra: try painting!)
■ Commence Painting 

Any color unevenness can be fixed later, so just go ahead and paint without worrying too much.

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Assembling the Cape: Part 1 (Extra: try painting!)
■ First coat ? something like this is more than enough for the first coat. 

You do not need to worry about unevenness with the first coat. The paint-job will even out once more layers are applied. Please be sure to paint right up to the edges. There are three main elements to painting a clean and beautiful finish: consistently make your strokes from top to bottom, paint in a location with as little dust as possible, and take measures so as to prevent any dust from accumulating on the surface until the paint is completely dry.

Assembling the Cape: Part 1 (Extra: try painting!)
■ With the second coat, you end up with a much nicer finish. 

Every time you finish one layer, give it plenty of time to dry. If you start the next coat before the previous layer dries, it will make a mess of the areas already painted. The time it takes to be fully dry will differ depending on your environment, but if you have used undiluted Vallejo paints, the surface should dry in roughly 1-2 hours. If you are unsure, we recommend leaving it for a little bit more.

Assembling the Cape: Part 1 (Extra: try painting!)
■ Make sure the paint you mixed doesn't dry out while the painted area is drying 
Assembling the Cape: Part 1 (Extra: try painting!)
■ The third coat 

Once you've come this far, there's just a little more to go. Please be careful not to forget to paint areas like the collar.

Assembling the Cape: Part 1 (Extra: try painting!)
■ When assembling the cape, you can avoid unwanted staining if you've made sure not to paint the areas that will touch the shoulders. 
Assembling the Cape: Part 1 (Extra: try painting!)
■ How it looks after the fourth coating. 

Once this is done, you're finished. Vallejo paints conceal very well, so the more layers you apply, the better the result you will end up with.

Assembling the Cape: Part 1 (Extra: try painting!)
■ Give it a very light rub down a few times with the sanding sponge 

After the final layer of paint has dried, remove any areas where the paint sticks out using the sanding sponge. Once you are satisfied with the paint job, apply a layer of top-coating to protect the painted surface prior to assembly. Here we use 'Water-Based Top Coat (Matte)'.

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Assembling the Cape: Part 1 (Extra: try painting!)
■ You can purchase this at the Volks online store or any local hobby shop. 

As this product is water-based, the odor is not too strong, but we still suggest using it outdoors. Coat the cape so that even if you make a mistake in the final stages you won't spoil the paint. If the spray can is cooled, the contents may clog up and not spray evenly. In order to prevent clogging, you should slightly warm the can before use. We suggest soaking the can in water heated to around 40 degrees Celsius.

Assembling the Cape: Part 1 (Extra: try painting!)
■ Warm it like this until the can feels warm in your hands. 

You can also prepare the parts while waiting for the can to become warm. We suggest attaching handles to the parts so you can spray them uniformly without having to hold them.

Assembling the Cape: Part 1 (Extra: try painting!)
■ Be careful of the durability of the handle as it may come off while you're applying the spray (note: picture is just an example) 

Take the utmost care to make sure there's no dust on the surface of the parts. Another thing to beware of when you start spraying is that, often the first spurt of spray is clogged up, so we advise you to start off by spraying a bit of the paint at something else before painting the figure.

Assembling the Cape: Part 1 (Extra: try painting!)
■ Move slowly from left to right, and right to left... 
Assembling the Cape: Part 1 (Extra: try painting!)
■ Make sure you don’t miss the crevasses in the parts. 

First begin by painting the complicated areas such as the area around her shoulders, and the folds of the cape. Then spray over the large open areas, moving slowly from left to right, then right to left. Please make sure you do not to apply too much paint to any single area as it will result in an uneven coat. First of all, apply coating to one half and wait until it is fully dry. Then, hold the handle with the other hand, and apply the paint to the other half.

Assembling the Cape: Part 1 (Extra: try painting!)
■ Done! 

It may be difficult to see from this picture, but as a result of the top coat, the paint is secure, and the overall feel of the cape has improved. It is now uniformly matte. Both the painting and the coating processes are done, and all preparations required before assembly are complete.

 

 

 

(9) Assembling the Cape part 2

Assembling the Shoulder Plates »  |   Assembling the Entire Cape »  |   Assembling the Talisman (Necklace) » 

♦ Assembling the Shoulder Plates

Start off by assembling the left and right shoulder plates individually.

Assembling the Cape: Part 2
■ An overview of the shoulder plate parts. (10 parts total) 
Assembling the Cape: Part 2
■ With each side, the black base that connects to the cape is different, be sure to confirm left and right sides. 
Assembling the Cape: Part 2
■ Finished! Of course, remember to perform a trial assembly before proceeding with the use of glue. 

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♦ Assembling the Entire Cape

For this section, it's easy to make a mistake if you don't follow the correct order of assembly. Again, please be sure to do a trial assembly first.

Assembling the Cape: Part 2
■ First attach the golden cloak clasps onto the cape. Assembling the Cape: Part 2
■ Attach the shoulder plates on to the cape, make sure not to mix up left and right. 
Assembling the Cape: Part 2
■ Finally, attach the collar piece on to the cape. 
Assembling the Cape: Part 2
■ The finished cape 

When assembling, the thin and slender parts are more likely to warp; and sometimes may not fit properly. Here, the collar piece is most likely to be warped.

Assembling the Cape: Part 2
■ A little uneven 

In these instances, warming the parts makes them softer, hence allowing you to correct their shapes just by gently pushing on them with your fingers. When you cool off the warmed parts, they will harden again. When warming them with a hairdryer, it is vital that you be careful not to overdo it. It's also fine to dip them in hot water of about 80-90 degrees (Celsius) for 20 seconds; however we recommend that you do that only before painting them. Please be very careful not to burn yourself.

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♦ Assembling the Talisman (Necklace)

Assembling the Cape: Part 2
■ These are small parts so be careful not to lose them. 

As with the other talisman parts, remove the gate residue as thoroughly as possible.

 

Assembling the Cape: Part 2
■ Done! The string in the photo has been cut to about 6.5cm long. 

 

 

(10) Final Assembly

Final Assembly
■ These are the fruits of your labor thus far. 

♦ Final Assembly

Final Assembly
■ Put the string on the talisman through the cape first. 
Final Assembly
■ Next, place the body through the talisman string and cape. Remember to adjust the position of the talisman. 
Final Assembly
■ Place the head onto the assembly. 
Final Assembly
■ Finally, make minor adjustments and make sure she stands firmly, and you’re done! 

It’s very convenient to leave the head and torso unglued, as it is very easy to remove the cape whenever you want.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 
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